King David reigns in the Nunthorpe

They don't call him the sprint king for nothing. David Nicholls once again took centre stage at York when Bahamian Pirate, one of his evergreen charges, put up the performance of his career to win the Victor Chandler Nunthorpe Stakes.

They don't call him the sprint king for nothing. David Nicholls once again took centre stage at York when Bahamian Pirate, one of his evergreen charges, put up the performance of his career to win the Victor Chandler Nunthorpe Stakes.

It came seven years after the Sessay, near Thirsk, trainer, had shared the same Group One prize with Ya Malak, ridden by his wife Alex Greaves, who dead-heated with another North Yorkshire-trained horse Coastal Bluff.

"The old boy came into this race in tremendous form," said Nicholls, after his nine-year-old had got home by a neck from former stable companion The Tatling. "He was absolutely bouncing and he loves this soft ground.

"Although he is nine, he seems to be as good, if not better, than ever. He can compete on faster ground but some cut means so much to him.

"I suppose because of his age a few people will knock the form and suggest it was a sub-standard Nunthorpe. They can think what they like, but he is still a good horse and he might get more credit for his win if he was trained down south.

"Bahamian Pirate lost his way for a while but he has been running well lately and it has helped to restore his confidence.

"You can't let him fall out of the gate. He needs somebody to get hold of him and let him know who is boss and Seb Sanders did just that."

The Stanley Leisure Sprint Cup at Haydock is on the agenda before another crack at the Prix de l'Abbaye at Longchamp in which he was sixth last year.

"He was unlucky not to win it last year when he got knocked about and then got stopped in his tracks," said Nicholls.

Not many sprinters that leave Nicholls improve out of all recognition, but The Tatling, expertly handled by another genius at preparing speed merchants, Milton Bradley, is an exception considering he is now performing at the highest level after being snapped up out of a claimer at Catterick.

The Tatling was finishing second in the race for the second successive year. Twelve months ago he became his trainer's first runner in a Group One and has continued to compete successfully at the highest level, having gained his biggest success the King's Stand Stakes at Royal Ascot.

One Cool Cat finished fast to take third after being four lengths off the pace a furlong out.

He didn't get a clear run in the closing stages and needs further than the minimum. The Breeders' Cup Mile is reported to be his autumn objective.

Avonbridge finished fourth after looking the likely winner and trainer Roger Charlton said: "The first-time blinkers worked but the soft ground was against him and if it had been faster he would have won."

Tony Culhane received a one-day ban after forcing Polar Bear's head in front in the last stride for a short-head verdict in the City of York Stakes and he misses the Blaydon Races day at Newcastle.

Soar earned a 20-1 quote from Ladbrokes for next year's 1,000 Guineas following her victory over Salsa Brava in the Jaguar Lowther Stakes.

Her only defeat in four starts was against Damson in the Queen Mary Stakes at Ascot and the filly will be taking her on again in the Cheveley Park Stakes.

"Johnny (Murtagh) says we shouldn't be afraid of Damson after this so that's where he will go," said trainer James Fanshawe.

Kieren Fallon collected his trophy as top jockey at the three-day festival after partnering his fourth winner at the meeting on the improving Lost Soldiers Three in the Kone Plc Melrose Rated Stakes.

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