Villagers all go in to bat for David

Big-hearted cricketers from a North village have smashed the world record for the longest continuous match, while raising vital charity funds in memory of a young player who died last year.

Big-hearted cricketers from a North village have smashed the world record for the longest continuous match, while raising vital charity funds in memory of a young player who died last year.

Sports-mad batsmen and bowlers from Red Row, near Amble, snatched victory from previous holders in Australia at 7.10pm last night, after a marathon 34-hour innings.

And it meant braving four seasons worth of weather during the two-day spell at the crease, which started on Saturday.

The formidable 22 were cheered on throughout by well-wishers from the former mining community, near Amble.

It was all staged in memory of Red Row cricket club player David Griffiths, 20, who died during an asthma attack at work at an Amble food factory last December.

Event spokesman Bruce Jobson said: "They've played in rain, wind and even hailstones, under floodlights and through the night to break this record.

"A lot of people actually turned up throughout the night to keep the lads' spirits up.

"The level of support we've had in organising this event and carrying it through tells of how much the community has come together for such a good cause."

Helping to ease the strain on players were sports physiotherapy students from Northumberland College, led by instructor Eileen Baron.

"We've been very busy, but it's been invaluable experience for the students," she said. "They've been taping, strapping and icing almost non-stop."

And at 7.10pm last night, the game finally came to a close - half-an-hour longer than the previous record, set by a club from Brisbane.

Bruce added: "We're absolutely delighted with the result, which is a payback to the Aussies for what happened at the Ashes." As well as the match, a weekend of activities was also held in the village in the hope of raising about £25,000 for Asthma UK.

Adjudicators and timekeepers from Guinness World Records were also present to authenticate the record, which will appear in the next edition of the famous book.

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