View over Hadrian's Wall scoops international award

This stunning view from the Roman side of Hadrian’s Wall looks into what was once a barbarian wilderness – and is now Northumberland National Park

One of Rich Bunce's photographs
One of Rich Bunce's photographs

Richard Bunce, 32, from Ilkley in Yorkshire, beat thousands to win a commendation from the Garden Photographers’ Association.

His picture of foxgloves at the Wall earned a place in the GPA’s gigantic coffee table book and shows just how stunning the county can be.

Mr Bunce said: “I love the rugged and wild atmosphere of the Northumberland landscape. It’s very easy for your imagination to run wild as you roam through such an ancient and well-preserved environment.

“You feel a bit closer to everything – a bit closer to nature, closer to history. There’s the sense of all those people that have walked the paths and roads before.

“It’s amazing to think that you would have found foxgloves around this same area during the Roman occupation of the wall.”

The London-born rambler, who calls himself ‘the walking photographer’, was travelling with his wife Caroline in the summer of 2013 when he spotted the flowers “regimented, all lined up.”

Artist and photographer Rich Bunce has received a commendation in the International Garden Photographer of the Year competition
Artist and photographer Rich Bunce has received a commendation in the International Garden Photographer of the Year competition
 

His photo looks down onto Crag Lough towards the hills looming over Cawfield Quarry.

Mr Bunce said: “It was a really grey day when I took the photo. I’m always saying in my workshops that you can take great photos in any weather. Now I have a great example I can use!”

He hopes to return to Northumberland soon with his dog Alfie – a two-year-old lurcher rescued by the RSPCA a few months after the winning picture was taken.

And he told budding photographers to experiment with angles and try for a different perspective when walking the great North hills.

He said: “It’s very easy to take good photos in that area because it’s so stunning.

“There’s so many lines – the walls, the horizons, the clouds – so you need to think about where you position them and how your eye is drawn through the scene.”

Italian Rosanna Castrini won the grand prize with a snap of flowers growing in her own garden ‘prairie’.

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