V for Vendetta graffiti cleanup of Penshaw Monument paid for by bank

The National Trust's Penshaw Monument in Sunderland was daubed with red paint slogans from the film and graphic novel V for Vendetta

Donors come forward to fund Penshaw Monument graffiti removal
Donors come forward to fund Penshaw Monument graffiti removal

The clean-up of a historic landmark despoiled by a paint-spraying attack has been paid for by donations from individuals and businesses angered by the damage.

The National Trust’s Penshaw Monument in Sunderland was daubed with red paint slogans from the film and graphic novel V for Vendetta .

This features an anarchist freedom fighter who attempts to ignite a revolution against a brutal regime which has subjugated the UK.

Three sides of the monument’s base and several columns were defaced with paint.

“It was quite a shock when we discovered it and there was a passionate reaction from local people and a lot of anger,” said the National Trust’s Kate Horn.

“It’s a shame. People may want to express their views but this is not the way to do it. and all it has done is anger people.

“The monument is open 24 hours a day but this sort of incident is very rare and we hope it won’t happen again.”

Barclays Bank was among the donors who have contributed to the £1,500 cleaning costs of specialist contractors Gavin Small Stone Restoration of Chester-le-Street .

Gareth Wilson, area ranger for the National Trust said: “We are incredibly grateful to Barclays as well as the individual donors who have shown such concern, wanting to help us restore the monument.

“This is a place that means so much to so many people. “

Raymond Pettitt, managing director of community banking at Barclays, said: “Our colleagues were very disappointed to hear about the vandalism and we were keen to find a way to help the specialist clean-up operation.

“Penshaw is such an important part of the heritage of the local and regional community and is very close to our major contact centre in Doxford Park in Sunderland.

“It’s always been a special and popular place for our colleagues and their families to visit, as it is for many people from across the region. “

Other donations have come from private donors including Ron Colledge, a National Trust tenant farmer from Easington in County Durham.

Any additional donations will be put towards essential conservation work at Penshaw Monument as well as projects to maintain and improve public access.

Gareth said: “We really do try to make every penny count. The ranger team and volunteers work hard to keep the monument and surrounding land at its best. “

The monument, which was completed in 1844, was subscribed to and dedicated by people in County Durham to John George Lambton, first earl of Durham and first governor of Canada.

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