UKIP's North East MEP says his party is coming after Labour

Ukip's first MEP for the North East has criticised David Cameron's failure to block Jean-Claude Juncker from taking the EU's top job

Candidate for the European Parliment Jonathan Arnott, at the Sage, Gateshead.

UKIP’S first MEP for the region has talked of his party’s ambition to shatter the dominance of long-standing Labour strongholds.

Former maths teacher Jonathan Arnott, who lives in Guisborough, Teesside, said Ukip is now challenging for power in areas across the North East which have traditionally voted Labour for half a century because Labour had lost touch with the working class.

Jonathan said: “At the recent European elections in Redcar, Ukip secured 11,087 votes, compared to Labour’s 8,548. In Stockton, Ukip got 13,862 votes, with Labour on 12,579. And in Middlesbrough, a long-standing Labour stronghold, UKIP gained 8,695 votes, with Labour on 8,429.

“We’ve got to build on those results so that we’re not just seen for our views on the European Union and immigration. Our no tax on the minimum wage policy is going down well in working class areas.

“At the moment, we’re gaining a lot of support in Blyth, Northumberland. Many of our supporters in these areas say they feel abandoned by Labour.”

During the May European elections Labour topped the North East poll with 221,988 votes and Ukip got 177,660.

The Conservative vote dropped by around 10,000 to 107,733 and under the European voting system the result was enough for Martin Callanan, leader of the Conservatives in Europe and a 15-year veteran on the parliament, to lose his seat.

Labour took two of the North East’s three European parliament seats, with one going to UKIP.

But that gain has not been matched elsewhere in the region, with UKIP not holding a single parliamentary seat and only having a handful of councillors. It is not widely thought that UKIP will be actively targeting sitting North East MPs as it is more likely to concentrate its efforts on other parts of the country.

Mr Arnott said that Prime Minister David Cameron’s failure to block Jean-Claude Juncker from becoming the next president of the European Commission has left the prime minister “outnumbered, humiliated and utterly isolated.”

He said “The whole process is a sham, in so many ways. Whether you got Schultz or Juncker doesn’t matter anyway, virtually no-one in the UK has heard of either of them.

“The Prime Minister went to war over the appointment of the next commission president but it was a war that he was clearly going to lose.

“There is an increasingly bad relationship between Britain’s leaders and the leaders of many other European countries.”

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