Run Geordie Run fundraiser Mark Allison smashes £40,000 barrier

Heroic fundraiser Mark Allison has so far raised more than £40,700 with his epic Australian challenge which now has just days to go

Run Geordie Run charity fundraiser Mark Allison pictured in Cotteslow Beach, Western Australia.
Run Geordie Run charity fundraiser Mark Allison pictured in Cotteslow Beach, Western Australia.

With just days until Mark Allison is expected to finish his Australian challenge, he has smashed through the £40,000 barrier.

Dubbed Run Geordie Run, the father-of-one has the finish line of his gruelling 2,600-mile run finally in sight.

Since he set off from Perth in October, the 42-year-old has raised more than £40,700 for charities the Sir Bobby Robson Foundation and the Children’s Foundation.

Mark still has 95 miles to go and has an additional 24 hours to complete the run after the British Consulate General helped change his flights home. It is believed that he will now finish in the coastal town of Shellharbour on January 4.

Mark yesterday tweeted: “Thank you to those kind folk who have made a donation.”

 

New Year’s eve saw the fund burst through the £40,000 milestone, which Mark said was “a great way to see in 2014.” His target is to raise a minimum of £50,000.

The final two days of the adventure will be tough as his feet are 60-70% numb, meaning he has to tread very carefully on uneven ground.

Mark’s girlfriend Donna wrote: “There are no signals sent to Mark’s brain to acknowledge any danger to his feet. This is something which will hopefully return once Mark has finished the run and had time to properly rest.”

Yet, Mark is determined to make it to the end of the epic challenge he started in honour of his mum, dad, and brother who have all passed away.

He yesterday tweeted: “Stopped for the day on 33 miles. 95 miles to go to the finish line. Left sock full of blood. I daren’t look. Right foot in agony.

“Donna has cleaned my left foot. Deformed toe nails have cut into adjacent toes causing the bleeding. No big deal, thankfully.

“It’s always nice to see blood on my kit. In a kind of Terry Butcher for England way.”

Last week, Mark, of Blyth, Northumberland, announced that his Australian challenge was over due to safety concerns, as he said it was too dangerous to keep travelling along one of the country’s most deadly roads - the Hume Highway.

But, within hours, he had a sudden change of heart and mapped out a different, safer, route for the last leg of his journey.

Mark set out from Cottesloe Beach, near Perth, and originally planned to run around 41 miles for 62 of the following 70 days, arriving at Bondai Beach in Sydney on Christmas Eve.

However, a series of setbacks meant the self-imposed deadline was shifted to allow him to continue to his new destination, Shellharbour by Saturday.

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