Posters recall days that drew the world

Colourful reminders of one of the biggest events to be staged in the North-East in the last century will be sold today.

Colourful reminders of one of the biggest events to be staged in the North-East in the last century will be sold today.

The North-East Coast Exhibition of 1929 attracted 4,373,138 visitors during its six-month run in Newcastle - more than 15 times the population of the city.

A poster advertising the event, by Sunderland-born artist Septimus Edwin Scott, is expected to fetch up to £500 at Anderson & Garland's Newcastle sale.

Another exhibition poster by the Newcastle Electric Supply Company, exhorting people to visit "Electricity Corner" in the event's Palace of Industries, will also be auctioned.

The Palace of Industries held more than 200 exhibits, including working displays of carpets, tin cans and Andrews Liver Salts being made.

The show, on what is now Exhibition Park, included the Women's Pavilion, Festival Hall, The Stadium, Palace of Engineering, Empire Marketing Board Pavilion and the Palace of Arts - the only building to survive in the park as the Military Vehicles Museum.

A Great Water Chute, an 80ft-high Himalayan Railway, and an African village where 100 Senegalese lived in mud huts were other attractions, as well as a boating lake with a bridge.

The Prince of Wales opened the exhibition which - with the Great Depression on the horizon - was intended to show that the region's industries were still a powerful part of the national economy.

The architects were W and TR Milburn of Sunderland and the art deco-style structures were made from compressed asbestos.

Anderson & Garland partner Julian Thomson said: "Scott was 50 when he was commissioned to produce his poster and he was by then a highly successful artist."

Scott, who died in 1966, also turned out some of the earliest footballs scenes ever painted, and several of his works are in the Harry Langton Collection of Football Art.

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