PM against Iraq inquiry

Prime Minister Tony Blair does not believe there should be an inquiry into the war in Iraq while British troops are on active service in the country, his official spokesman said yesterday.

Prime Minister Tony Blair does not believe there should be an inquiry into the war in Iraq while British troops are on active service in the country, his official spokesman said yesterday.

MPs will today debate a motion tabled by the Scottish and Welsh nationalists calling for a review by seven senior MPs into the handling of the war and its aftermath. Reports yesterday suggested that the Conservatives - who backed the 2003 war - may vote with SNP and Plaid Cymru MPs.

Coupled with the Liberal Democrats and Labour rebels, this could be enough to threaten Mr Blair's 62-strong majority.

Ross cleared

JONATHAN Ross has been cleared by broadcasting watchdog Ofcom after asking David Cameron whether he fantasised about Margaret Thatcher as a teenager.

Ross drew 251 complaints when he asked the Leader of the Opposition on his BBC1 chat show whether he "may have considered Margaret Thatcher in a carnal manner ... as pin up material".

Viewers complained that the comments, broadcast in June, were vulgar and disrespectful.

Ofcom said: "The interview was part of a late night chat show hosted by a presenter whose style is deliberately risque, satirical and provocative - an approach with which the large majority of the audience is very familiar."

Ofcom did not consider that the content of the interview was so extreme that it breached generally accepted standards.

Adulthood idea

YOUNG people who show that they are responsible could be given the chance to take on the rights of adulthood early under proposals being considered by Conservative leader David Cameron.

Mr Cameron said yesterday that the confusing array of legal ages for different activities should be simplified to provide a nationally-recognised "rite of passage" into adulthood.

Vaccine hope

A PROMISING MRSA vaccine has been successfully tested in mice, scientists reported yesterday.

The drug was effective against five virulent strains of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.

MRSA, or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, is the name given to S. aureus bacteria that are immune to most standard antibiotics. There are an estimated 17 strains of MRSA with varying levels of drug resistance. Scientists made the new vaccine by combining four proteins from the surface of the bacteria that were found to trigger strong immune responses in mice. The team were from the University of Chicago.

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