Office work is thing of the past

FLEXIBLE working campaigners in the North East are encouraging people to work from home on Friday to create the largest mass absence from work for a generation.

FLEXIBLE working campaigners in the North East are encouraging people to work from home on Friday to create the largest mass absence from work for a generation.

Work Wise North East wants the region to boost the estimated five million people who will not be going to work for National Work from Home Day 2009.

It forms part of the Work Wise Week, promoting flexible work arrangements like remote and mobile working, which aims to give half the working population the opportunity to work smarter by 2011.

Remote Employment, a web service dedicated to flexible and home based working, believes that the traditional ‘office’ is on the verge of a workplace revolution.

Paula Wynne, co-founder of Remote Employment and the Remote Worker Awards, advocates that the notion of nine to five might gradually vanish.

She said adopting a modern-day approach to working lives will increase business productivity and competitiveness, reduce transport congestion and pollution, improve health by reducing stress and harmonise our work and family commitments.

She said: “The recent emergence of virtual jobs and virtual communities is changing the way companies attract and retain skilled employees. With this new approach, the labour market is evolving towards remote working and working from home as viable options in their recruitment drive.”

There are already around 3.1m people working from home in the UK, which Work Wise expects to more than double by 2012.

For more information visit www.remoteemployment.com or www.workwiseuk.org

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