No civilian job losses envisaged at RAF Boulmer as part of wider cuts

THE Ministry of Defence does not envisage any jobs being lost at RAF Boulmer as part of plans to cut a further 7,000 civilian posts.

THE Ministry of Defence does not envisage any jobs being lost at RAF Boulmer as part of plans to cut a further 7,000 civilian posts.

Union leaders last night hit out after plans were announced by the Ministry of Defence to cut a further 7,000 civilian posts on top of a previously-announced cull of 25,000 jobs.

RAF Boulmer plays a key role in the homeland defence of the UK. Around 1,000 service, civilian and contracted personnel work on the station that is also home to search and rescue helicopters.

Last night Berwick MP Sir Alan Beith, whose constituency includes Boulmer, said: “Clearly, the frontline has to be the priority.

“But until we see details we cannot know whether posts are threatened which provide a vital support role for the work of RAF Boulmer.”

The Liberal Democrat MP added: “There are also three civilian jobs which are already threatened at the Goswick Sands Unexploded Ordnance clearance about which I had a meeting last week.”

An RAF Boulmer spokeswoman said: “The additional cuts will be from 2015 and we don’t envisage any impact on RAF Boulmer.”

The Public and Commercial Services union (PCS) said the proposals to cut a further 7,000 civilian posts were “shameful” when efforts were still being made to reduce the MoD’s civilian workforce.

PCS general secretary Mark Serwotka said cutting so many civilian and military jobs could put lives at risk, adding: “This is a shameful way to treat anybody, far less the people who serve on the frontline, and those who support them.

“Since the defence review announcement in October, PCS has been thwarted at every turn in our attempts to find out where these cuts will be made and what impact it will have on the frontline.”

An MoD spokesman added: “Tough decisions have had to be made to tackle the black hole in the MoD’s finances.

“Now, for the first time in a generation, the MoD will have brought its future plans and future budget into close alignment.

“One of the measures necessary to achieve this is to further reduce civilian staff numbers by an additional 7,000, expected to begin from 2015.

“Much of this will be achieved through reductions in recruiting and not replacing those who leave. Compulsory redundancy programmes would be used only as a last resort.”

Tough decisions have had to be made to tackle the black hole in the MoD’s finances

 

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