James Bond cinema posters sell for £3,000 at Newcastle auction

A sale at Anderson and Garland in Newcastle has seen a collection of cinema items raise more than £3,000

Fred Wyrley-Birch, with the James Bond poster, at Anderson and Garland, in Westerhope
Fred Wyrley-Birch, with the James Bond poster, at Anderson and Garland, in Westerhope

Cinema posters saved from the rubbish heap have raised more than £3,000 at auction.

Childhood visits to a lavish cinema with his parents cast a spell on Peter Douglas.

Then living in Wallsend, Peter was taken to the Black’s Regal cinema in Shields Road in Byker, Newcastle, which was acquired in 1955 by the Rank Organisation and became an Odeon.

The building inspired Peter, who now lives in Blyth in Northumberland, to spend years taking photographs of North East cinemas and to pursue a career as a projectionist.

Black’s Regal was opened in 1934 to seat 1,645 with wooden panelled foyers based on the design of a transatlantic liner and a floodlit organ.

Now cinema posters which Peter saved decades ago have sold for £3,130.

The top price at the Anderson & Garland sale in Newcastle was £2,000 for a 1964 poster for the James Bond film Goldfinger.

The posters were collected by Peter Douglas in his first job at the Classic Cinema in Low Fell, Gateshead.

One of the James Bond posters, at Anderson and Garland, in Westerhope
One of the James Bond posters, at Anderson and Garland, in Westerhope
 

Mr Douglas, who now works as projectionist at The Forum cinema in Hexham, said: “They have been in the cupboard for 20 or 30 years.”

The Classic, where the majority of the posters were originally displayed, was pulled down in the 1990s.

Mr Douglas also worked at the listed art deco Wallaw Cinema in Blyth, which closed in 2004 and is now a Wetherspoon’s pub.

Mr Douglas, who has built up a collection of cinema signs, clocks and light fittings, said: “But I wish I’d paid more interest to the posters – the room at The Classic was full of them. I didn’t realise they had any value until a few years ago.”

A brass magic lantern and two wooden boxes containing more than 100 glass slides of Captain Scott’s ill-fated 1019 Antarctic expedition, taken by the group’s photographer

Herbert Ponting, were estimated at £800-£12,00 but sold for £6,200 at the sale.

They had been bought by a Sunderland rag and bone man in the 1940s for two shillings and six pence.

A book of cartoons, sketches, poems and observations by more than 120 wounded First World War soldiers, kept from 1916-1919 by South Shields nurse Frances Maguire, sold for £600.

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