History of the Cooperage

1430: The Cooperage is built. The ground floor ceiling timbers are reported to have come from a Dutch merchant ship sunk in the river Tyne.

1430: The Cooperage is built. The ground floor ceiling timbers are reported to have come from a Dutch merchant ship sunk in the river Tyne.

1531: The building is granted to Thomas Horsley, a Newcastle merchant and founder of Newcastle Grammar School. For the next 200 years, until 1742, it is occupied by prominent merchant families, changing hands roughly every generation.

1841: J Robson, a silk dyer, buys the building and moves his family in.

1853: The building is used as a grocery store.

1876 - 1880: John Arthur Cooper, from whom the building gets its name, buys the building. He runs the Cooperage for almost a century. After six generations the family business moves to Ponteland in 1974.

1974: The building becomes a public house.

August 2003: An archeological dig unearths an unusually well-preserved wooden bowl and various pieces of pottery from the 14th and 15th Centuries.

April 2005: A four-month dig unearths pottery pieces and household equipment. It also uncovers a back room brewery house and some Roman remains.

July 2005: Unique Leisure refurbish the building and transform it into a café bistro/ bar club.

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