Family of killed Alnwick cyclist Eilidh Cairns hold vigil at scene

FAMILY and friends of a young Northumberland woman killed after being knocked off her bike four years ago today are to gather at the spot to mark the anniversary.

FAMILY and friends of a young Northumberland woman killed after being knocked off her bike four years ago today are to gather at the spot to mark the anniversary.

Eilidh Cairns, 30, from near Alnwick, died after a HGV hit her bike in London on February 5, 2009.

Today, her mother Heather and sister Kate will join Eilidh’s friends at the spot in the capital where the fatal collision occurred to mark the anniversary.

The family members will then take part in a vigil organised by a group with which they are campaigning for cyclist safety.

Tomorrow, they are to attend a parliamentary inquiry which is examining what can be done to encourage more people in Britain to cycle.

Eilidh was raised at Ellingham and was a former student at Alnwick’s Duchess’s Community High School. She was living in London where she was working for a television production company when she was killed.

Today, Heather, a retired teacher and leader of Alnwick District Council who still lives at Ellingham, and Kate, an independent sustainability adviser from Newton by the Sea, will join Eilidh’s friends at the collision scene, which is marked by a Ghost bike memorial, to commemorate the anniversary.

They will then join other bereaved families in a vigil in the city dedicated to all cyclists and pedestrians killed by lorries on Britain’s streets.

This is being organised by RoadPeace, the group which is now co-ordinating the family’s See Me Save Me campaign which calls for an improved post-crash response and safer lorries.

The vigil was arranged to coincide with the anniversary of Eilidh’s death.

Tomorrow, her loved ones are to attend the All Party Parliamentary Cycling Group’s inquiry Get Britain Cycling.

The inquiry is examining the barriers which are preventing more people from cycling in the UK.

A panel of MPs and peers are taking verbal evidence from a selected group of witnesses.

A report with recommendations will be written by Professor Phil Goodwin and will be published in mid-April.

Last night, Heather said of her daughter: “It is just terribly sad that it is a life lost of somebody who was so young and vigorous along with many others.

“It is happening every week and still nothing is done to prevent it.”

Sara Dowling, campaigns and development manager at RoadPeace, said: “Despite all that is being done to tackle dangerous lorries, cyclists and pedestrians are still being killed or maimed with alarming regularity on our urban streets.

“Often the known lorry blind spot is blamed, yet we know HGV safety technology exists which can eliminate the blind spot and would dramatically reduce the number of people killed or maimed each year.

“See Me Save Me is calling for the mandatory use of these life-saving technologies.”

 

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