British Science Festival continues to bring crowds to Newcastle

A mock virus struck Newcastle city centre and children examined the DNA of mammoths as an international event continues to bring crowds to the city

Logan Sibley with the Mammoth Tooth
Logan Sibley with the Mammoth Tooth

A mock virus struck Newcastle city centre and children examined the DNA of mammoths as an international event continues to bring crowds to the city.

The British Science Festival is being held in the North East until Thursday and yesterday saw the children’s programme of events get underway.

The much-anticipated Epifection social experiment explored how the city would cope with the outbreak of a new disease.

Scientists gathered at Newcastle University for the experiment and a series of workshops as they asked participants what they would do if an infection took hold in the area.

 

Dr Nick Jakubovics, lecturer in oral microbiology, said: “Hopefully, the public will gain a better understanding of infectious disease, including outbreaks and control measures.

“It is important that people understand what to do when outbreaks and epidemics hit. Epifection will bring home to people just what could happen if a serious disease broke out in the Newcastle area.”

Meanwhile at The Centre for Life youngsters got involved in the Mammoth DNA workshop.

They got the chance to handle real mammoth fossils and the opportunity to try DNA fingerprinting with science explainer Helen Man.

Among a series of other events, marine biologist Michael Sweet also discussed how minute organisms shape the planet.

Journalists

David Whetstone
Culture Editor
Graeme Whitfield
Business Editor
Mark Douglas
Newcastle United Editor
Stuart Rayner
Sports Writer