Health MOT: Kim Davies, retired deputy principal of Gateshead College

Later this month he is climbing Kilimanjaro, Africa’s highest mountain, with his younger son Nick, an accountant, with sponsorship going to the Gateshead College Foundation.

Kim Davies on top of Skiddaw in the Lake District
Kim Davies on top of Skiddaw in the Lake District

KIM Davies retired as deputy principal of Gateshead College two years ago and is now a management consultant.

Later this month he is climbing Kilimanjaro, Africa’s highest mountain, with his younger son Nick, an accountant, with sponsorship going to the Gateshead College Foundation.

Donations can be made to the Foundation by contacting foundation@gateshead.ac.uk

Were you ill much as a child?

Nothing beyond the usual measles, chickenpox etc. My parents didn’t seem to believe in being ill.

What sports and activities did you take part in at school?

Mainly football, with bits of rugby and cricket thrown in. A few weeks ago I realised that my chances of making the Tottenham team are running out.

Have you ever had a health scare?

Nothing serious except for a motorbike accident which gave me a badly broken leg: I was told I wouldn’t be able to walk unaided again – if this was a motivational technique on the part of the surgeon it worked.

Have you ever had an operation?

Several on the above leg, including bone graft and attractive skin grafts.

How often do you exercise and what do you do?

Daily: mainly walking up and down the hill into Durham City, and up mountains in the Lakes as often as possible. Plus unavoidable gardening.

What’s the most challenging activity/event you’ve ever done?

Kilimanjaro in two weeks’ time blocks out any other thoughts. Apart from Altitude Sickness, malaria, and sheer exhaustion the greatest challenge will be for Nick and I to spend the whole week in each other’s company without me giving him lots of helpful advice.

Have you ever done the Great North Run?

No, and incip- ient arth- ritis in the ankle will relieve me of any obligation to try.

How do you keep motivated?

The interest, pleasure and satisfaction in what I do means no other motivation is needed.

What’s your diet like and how could you change it?

It’s wide-ranging and pretty healthy, with lots of fruit, vegetables, fish, meat: anything except pot noodles. I could stop eating all my friends’ nibbles when I go round for dinner.

Have you ever been on a diet and did it work?

No, although I have a tendency to go for the ‘see food’ diet if unchecked.

Are you happy with your body?

Delighted. I don’t know what I’d do without it.

What are your guilty pleasures?

Spider solitaire as an alternative to thinking, and working my way through a tray of bread pudding.

How much do you drink a week?

About a bottle of wine, or so, usually at the weekend. Most days are alcohol-free.

Have you ever smoked?

I gave up at the age of 10 after a packet of Consulate.

What are your health and fitness goals for the future?

To keep walking into the sunset.

 

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