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Wind section at the Priory

A MORE dramatic location for an open-air concert than Tynemouth Priory would be difficult to find, but this exposed headland is at the mercy of the elements.

Mouth of the Tyne Festival concert, Tynemouth Priory

A more dramatic location for an open-air concert than Tynemouth Priory would be difficult to find, but this exposed headland is at the mercy of the elements.

While Saturday was rain-free at the coast, the high wind was a little disruptive, causing delays, technical problems and what looked like near freezing conditions for the performers on stage. Most of the audience didn't seem to mind hanging around too much, as the Mouth of the Tyne concert is a social event with groups of people sitting on deck chairs around tables laden with bottles of wine and picnic food. Long set-ups just meant a bit more chit chat as the sun set in these spectacular surroundings.

The programme was a nice balance of popular folk, Latino and African music, kicking off with Boys of the Lough, a five piece performing Irish and Scottish folk music on fiddle, flute, accordion and pipe.

Next up was the lively 12-piece Alex Wilson Salsa Orchestra who mix salsa with R&B and Cuban music. Playing songs from their new album including a version of Chaka Khan's Ain't Nobody.

The West African singer, guitar and kora player Mory Kanté, however, did get most of the audience on their feet for a vibrant set which competed well with a firework display in South Shields. Kanté closed with an extended version of the hit which made his name in Europe in 1988, Yéké Yéké, playfully teasing the audience with numerous false endings before leaving the stage wrapped in a blanket.

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