Strutt & Parker in warning over manorial rights

Landowners are running out of time to ensure their manorial interests are protected through registration at the Land Registry

A general picture of a hill farm landscape
A general picture of a hill farm landscape

Landowners are running out of time to ensure their manorial interests are protected through registration at the Land Registry, said land agency firm Strutt & Parker.

Manorial rights and interests, or “overriding interests” as they are sometimes known, include sporting and mineral rights, or even the right to hold a fair or market on the land.

They are likely to be lost if they are not registered by midnight on October 13, 2013.

After this date, they will lose their automatic protection and will no longer be legally binding.

The registration process, set by the Land Registration Act 2002, will contribute to a comprehensive register of all the land in England and Wales – who owns it and what rights do the owners or others have over it.

It is hoped it will reduce uncertainty over the exact number and the extent of manorial rights in the country and to whom they belong.

Until now, overriding interests have not had to be registered but are still binding upon the owner of the land in question.

It is currently possible to buy land subject to manorial rights about which buyers know nothing.

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