Pork feast promotes campaign to lift EU ban on feeding catering waste to pigs

Group of high-profile restaurants has served up a free public feast as part of a campaign to encourage the EU to lift its ban on feeding catering waste to pigs

From left, Tristram Stuart, Thomasina Miers, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall and Sara Cox in Trafalgar Square, London, yesterday to promote The Pig Idea campaign, which is calling for legally-allowed food that is unfit for humans to be used as pig feed
From left, Tristram Stuart, Thomasina Miers, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall and Sara Cox in Trafalgar Square, London, yesterday to promote The Pig Idea campaign, which is calling for legally-allowed food that is unfit for humans to be used as pig feed

A group of high-profile restaurants has served up a free public feast as part of a campaign to encourage the EU to lift its ban on feeding catering waste to pigs.

The pork feast in London’s Trafalgar Square yesterday lunchtime saw an estimated 5,000 meals handed out to raise awareness of The Pig Idea campaign, which is calling for legally-allowed food that is unfit for humans to be used as pig feed. Campaigners say the move would conserve food supplies, cut waste and farming costs and protect the environment.

They want a change to European law to allow food leftovers to be fed to pigs, backed by the introduction of a robust legal framework for its safe processing and use to avoid spreading animal diseases. One of the campaign’s leaders, food waste expert Tristram Stuart, said: “Everyone who has come here has sent a message to industry and policy-makers that there is a huge appetite for making our food system more sustainable.”

Members of the British Pig Executive (Bpex), which has voiced its opposition to reintroducing swill feeding, visited the event and said they welcomed initiatives to reduce food waste.

But Bpex said it had concerns with swill feeding and The Pig Idea’s campaign to reintroduce it. It said the process of swill feeding was “a lot more complex than what is currently being portrayed” and required a set of strict controls, with standards that were difficult to maintain.

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