From no man’s land to modern offices

THE renaissance of Newburn Riverside mirrors that of the North-East, emerging as it has from an industrial no man’s land to a modern, state-of-the-art business park.

THE renaissance of Newburn Riverside mirrors that of the North-East, emerging as it has from an industrial no man’s land to a modern, state-of-the-art business park.

It has been a staggering regeneration for the tract of land that formerly housed the Stella North Power Station and Anglo Great Lake Graphite Works.

Remediating the site was a mammoth operation, involving moving four million cubic metres of contaminated earth, enough to fill the Metro Radio Arena 44 times over.

In addition, nearly 2,500 tonnes of steel was recovered from the power station buildings and recycled for use elsewhere. Concrete foundations from the original buildings were used as landfill for the new development site.

One NorthEast became one of the first occupants of Newburn Riverside when Stella House was opened by then Prime Minister Tony Blair on January 22, 2004.

Stella House occupies a four-acre site and scooped the coveted Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM) excellent award before it was even open because of the relatively minor impact it has on the environment - solar powered heating and recycled rain water from the roof to flush toilets.

The Newburn Riverside site is estimated to be able to attract £116m worth of private sector investment and up to 5,000 new jobs.

The Newburn Riverside site is surrounded by a 4km nature trail/cycleway and is popular with walkers, cyclists and families.

The are is just one minute from the A1 and within 15 minutes of Newcastle International Airport and the site has full e-communications access.

Fast Facts:

The total area of the site is equivalent to 180 football pitches.

800 tonnes of graphite were recovered from the waste and 400 tonnes of baked carbon.

During the course of the works 21,000 trees have been planted amongst a total of 155,500 plants.

Stella Power Station used to put warm water into the Tyne and this was said to attract basking sharks.

Ed Rowley is acting director of regeneration for One NorthEast.

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David Whetstone
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Graeme Whitfield
Business Editor
Mark Douglas
Newcastle United Editor
Stuart Rayner
Sports Writer