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Teesside businessman calls for apprenticeships increase

A TEESSIDE businessman is calling on fellow firms to help increase the number of apprenticeships offered to young people.

A TEESSIDE businessman is calling on fellow firms to help increase the number of apprenticeships offered to young people.

Barry Parvin, a Guisborough care home owner, is urging colleagues in the care sector to “do their bit” to help the region’s out-of-work youngsters.

To launch his campaign, he has taken on his first apprentice, 18-year-old Shawn Howard, of Redcar, who has been given a role in the administration department of Barry’s Graceland Care Home where he will study for his NVQ Level 11 in business administration.

Barry, who is also chairman of the Redcar and Cleveland Care Providers Association, said: “Youngsters today have little chance of finding work when there are so few jobs available. Those of us in business need to go that extra mile to come up with more job opportunities, otherwise where will these youngsters end up?

“Going to university is no longer an option for many teenagers whose families simply cannot afford the huge tuition fees and this is already having an impact on youth unemployment in the North-east”.

Barry is working with the North-east region of the training and employment services provider, JHP Training, to highlight the problem.

JHP’s regional sales manager, Margaret Cholmondeley, said: “We could do with dozens more like Barry to create apprenticeship vacancies and in some small but important way ease the pressure on job-seeking youngsters in our region. We need to give them more of a chance to find career opportunities.

“If the care providers could find just one vacancy each it would really help. We will then work with them to identify the right young person for the vacancy to make sure they are on a career path they wish to follow. We then deliver the necessary training in conjunction with the employer to make the youngster ‘job ready’.

“Apprenticeship programmes are an excellent way of future-proofing the skills of your workforce. They deliver training designed around your business, providing the skilled workers you need for the future.

“They also help you to develop the knowledge base your business needs to keep pace with the latest technology and working practices. At the same time, it gives the employer the opportunity to develop the individual’s skills in a way that best suits the business”.

 

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