North East apprentices on route to engineering careers

Working with the North East Chamber of Commerce, the region's largest independent training provider, PSI Global have been introducing apprentices to their workforce since April 2010

PSI Global apprentices Craig Elliot and Terry Cottrell with operations director David Hunter
PSI Global apprentices Craig Elliot and Terry Cottrell with operations director David Hunter

A Durham-based specialist manufacturer has boosted its workforce with the addition of 10 new apprentices.

Working with the North East Chamber of Commerce, the region’s largest independent training provider, PSI Global have been introducing apprentices to their workforce since April 2010.

The firm manufactures and provides solutions for filters and separators to the compressed air and vacuum industries. It has offices and distribution warehouses located in Europe, North America and the Far East.

Operations director at PSI Global, David Hunter, said: “NECC has identified our needs, and created specific and tailored programmes which we are very happy with.

“Recruiting the apprentices has enabled us to specifically mould and grow these young people into successful engineers who we can retain for a long time.

“We are committed to the NECC apprenticeship programmes, and are looking to recruit two further apprentices in the near future.”

The programmes allow learners to gain real, on-the-job industry experience while working towards their qualifications. Learners emerge qualified, and with the skills and confidence they need to be a success in their field.

They are uniquely designed to meet the individual needs of the organisation, ultimately resulting in experienced employees, specifically skilled and accountable to them.

While these programmes are proving extremely popular for many large North East businesses, not everybody is committed to apprenticeships, which could potentially lead to a skills shortage in the region if not addressed.

NECC engineering training regional manager, Lindsey Thornton, said: “We have a plethora of large companies dedicated to apprenticeships and employee development.

However, it is not just the responsibility of large firms, schools, colleges and universities to ensure the future workforce is equipped with the requisite skill. Not enough is being done by the SMAs in the regional supply chain to address the potentially serious skills shortage.

“Around 80% of our engineering firms do not have apprentices or are not engaged in the skills development agenda. It is vital that these companies explore the potential of recruiting apprentices – motivated learners who can be moulded to meet the needs of the individual business.”

The NECC offer a wide range of tailor-made programmes to accommodate all levels of seniority. Their key benefit is the flexibility of delivery.

NECC is approved by Ofsted and is one of the largest independent apprenticeship training providers in the North East.

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