Green energy firm Opus Green wins £700,000 contract for homes in South Tyneside

A Benton green energy firm Opus Green is fitting scores of homes in South Tyneside with solar panels in a deal with £700,000

Leon Cowley, Corporate Environmental Officer for South Tyneside Homes; Chris Cassells, MD at Opus Green; Allan West, Lead Member for Housing and Transport and Michael Dixon, Opus Green Project Manager outside a home in Bamburgh Avenue, South Shields
Leon Cowley, Corporate Environmental Officer for South Tyneside Homes; Chris Cassells, MD at Opus Green; Allan West, Lead Member for Housing and Transport and Michael Dixon, Opus Green Project Manager outside a home in Bamburgh Avenue, South Shields

Hundreds of South Tyneside householders will find their energy bills drastically reduced through a £700,000 renewable energy project.

Green energy company Opus Green is fitting around 200 homes throughout the borough with solar PV panels, on behalf of South Tyneside Homes and South Tyneside Council.

The work will be carried out on properties in South Shields, Jarrow and Hebburn, and will be finished by September. It involves more than 2,000 solar panels being installed on the roofs of a mix of property types.

South Tyneside Homes is currently carrying out a survey to see which homes would be most suitable for the panels, which depends on several factors including roof condition and orientation.

Chris Cassells, managing director of Benton-based Opus Green, said: “The solar PV panels will generate free electricity during the day and make a huge difference to householders.

“The project is an ideal way for South Tyneside Council and South Tyneside Homes to tackle fuel poverty in the borough.It’s not just about reducing bills, the panels will also help the council and South Tyneside Homes reduce their carbon footprint in the borough. The project will save more than 200 tonnes of carbon dioxide per year, which is around 1.3 tonnes for each household. The panels capture the sun’s energy and convert it into electricity, and they don’t need direct sunlight to work – they can still generate electricity on a cloudy day.”

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